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05/23/2022

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Assistant Professor

For many journals and institutions, at least in theory the affiliation identified on the publication reflects the institution(s) at which you completed the research (and it is a way for the institution to get "credit" via your and your work for supporting you to do it). I know some people use non-institutional email addresses for their corresponding author contact (something still professional-appearing, though, like your first and last name at your email provider of preference) so that the contact email remains good regardless of future moves. But if you are findable online then people who really want to contact you will likely be able to track down a current email address without too many problems. Unlike the reader respond in the post, I have found that at the proof stage I am almost always asked to verify my correspondence details and so presumably could update those during the proofing if necessary, however.

Bill Vanderburgh

My impression is that some institutions only count work toward tenure and promotion that has their institutional affiliation on it. So it strikes me as a good idea to have your most current location on the article, provided that it will appear after the new job starts. (Delay in production probably won't be significant, and probably doesn't matter. But send a note to the editor ASAP rather than waiting for proofs.)

Tim

Speaking personally, I would update the institution to the new one. It may help you at the new institution. Leaving it as the old one is unlikely to help at the new. Normally, the affiliation and the email are distinct. So you could keep the same email, while changing affiliation.

Karl

Echoing Tim and Bill, put your current affiliation. Universities like to see their name on pubs. This makes you look good to the people who now matter to you. If possible or relevant, do not forget to thank some colleagues at the old institution for their support. People like to see themselves acknowledged.

sisyphus

Follow up question on this topic:

I've had various temporary positions, so my affiliations have changed often and they'll probably continue to change until (if) I find a permanent position, sadly. Annoyingly, the email addresses that institutions provide often only last a year after I leave the institution, thus some of the email addresses that I've provided on several publications are no longer active. Does anyone know if it's possible to update these with publishers in case anyone wants to reach out?

Assistant Professor

You should definitely update your affiliation to your new position. First, getting credit for the work at your new position often requires the current affiliation. Second, some universities cannot take credit for research published after the scholar leaves. Including an old affiliation on published work can cause headaches for the old department if a review of research uncovers they have been taking credit for work published by people not employed at time of publication. You can include acknowledgments of feedback from previous colleagues and you should include any required acknowledgments of grant funding.

If there are any questions, you should check with your current chair about what is required to get credit, since your current department is the one that matters now.

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