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06/02/2020

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yup

thanks for this.

Can we talk about making philosophy Q & As more comfortable for PoC and others? Would norms for better behavior help prevent those more empowered talking over others or re-explaining their points for them?

Some modest proposals:

In large audiences, ban follow-ups.

In large audiences, use an app to randomize question order.

Consider a card system like that used in Bellingham's summer conference (I've never been but know of the system), to ensure everyone can talk.

Ban 'questions' that are just comments. Every question must be a real question.

Prioritize PoC on the queue (many moderators I know already prioritize grads, junior scholars, and women, but we need to make sure race is in that mix).

Place a hard limit on the time spent on each question -- e.g., 2 minutes.

Other suggestions?

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