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09/10/2019

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UK person

There is an added complication: at UK universities, there is a big divide between 'pre-92' and 'post-92' institutions.

Pre-92s, i.e. the more well-known and research intensive institutions awarded university status before 1992, typically reserve the title "senior lecturer" for something like "associate professors", with "lecturers" being divided between "lecturer A" and "lecturer B" payscales. For post-92s "senior lecturer" is often applied to what pre-92s call "lecturer B". Thus, it is possible to move from a senior lecturer position at one university, to a lecturer position at another while still getting a pay rise, more time for research, better perks, and so on.

Anyway, I'd say that Assistant Profs at US institutions definitely have a shot at SL at pre-92s if they have an established research record and (perhaps especially these days) a record of successful grant applications. Assistant Profs would almost certainly be SLs at post-92s by default, as academic salaries in the US are higher, and the appointing institution typically doesn't want to offer a pay cut.

Some UK institutions have started to adopt the language of Assistant / Associate Prof just to be irritating and difficult, as far as I can tell. But basically, Marcus is right to think Assistant = L, Assoc. = SL, Prof = Prof.

Rosa

Yup, Lecturer is usually equivalent to Assistant, and Senior Lecturer to Associate. Some universities, though, are moving to "Assistant Professor" and "Associate Professor" titles to fall into line with US/Canada norms. As to whether you have a shot at Senior Lecturer, you might if you've been an Assistant Professor in the US for a few years. I believe (but am not certain!) that you usually go up for Senior Lecturer after 3 years as Lecturer (rather than the 5-7 it standardly takes to go from Assistant to Associate in the US).

Rosa

(Sorry, I guess I added my comment while UK person's was waiting approval - their answer is better.)

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