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02/17/2017

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postdoc

The APA's Statement on Offers of Employment recommends two weeks: http://www.apaonline.org/general/custom.asp?page=offers

They don't explicitly say that that's for TT appointments only, so it might be some ammunition for you. If the visiting position has confirmed that it will follow the APA's recommended job market calendar (which confirmation you can find in the Philjobs listing), then they've committed to offering two weeks.

I would also notify your flyout that you have an offer; sometimes they can speed up the decision timeline. Good luck!

Amanda

Thanks postdoc!

anotheranon

Hmmm...I agree with postdoc. Ask for the second week. Also, since each school has different processes, you may find that there's more time.

In the past, for temporary positions, I've "accepted" the offer verbally from the department after two weeks and then was given a contract (a week later) and, in the language of the written offer, had two weeks from the date of its writing. So, effectively, I had 5 weeks to "accept".

So, in short, find out what the process is when you ask for more time.

(And if you do get a TT, back out of the 1-year position! Yes, the department offering the 1-year will be sad for a little bit, but get out of the hell-hole of the job search. I think it would be an entirely different story if you accept a TT offer and then back out it for another TT.)

Craig

I agree with everything, but especially with anotheranon: You've only got one career. If you accept a 1-year position and then get a TT offer, I'd not judge you in the least if you ditched the 1-year position to accept the TT position. I would think this anyway, but I would think this to be especially the case where the 1-year position is pushing you to decide quickly.

For what it is worth, in my career, my first position out of my own graduate department was a position vacated at the last minute by someone who had accepted a one-year position. The department survived--in fact, they barely noticed. I'm retracting acceptances does cause departments headaches, but that's the price of admission for being in the world.

slac chair

I agree with the comments above. If you get the job, ditch the one-year. I've had temporary faculty pull out (even after courses assigned and scheduled) because they got a better (i.e., more secure) offer. It's a hassle for me, but I certainly understand and bear no ill will toward the folks who've done that.

chair at regional state u

I agree with slac chair.

Amanda

Thanks for all the feedback everyone. I was given an extra week (to wait to hear from an earlier flyout). I did not mention the TT flyout in two weeks, for I figure if I do get that I will just have to back out.

I suspect that these situations are only going to get worse with the extended job market. It is possible that a person can be offered a TT position as early as Nov and as late as April. So theoretically, one could be offered 3 or even 4 (unlikely) positions in that time. I myself would tell a candidate that it is such a huge life changer, and candidates are disadvantaged, that backing out for a better offer is the right choice. But having to do it myself I just feel icky and less than honest. It is an unfortunate that this is the way we are headed.

Consider, for instance, if someone was offered a job in November. The job market is horrible, and so anyone except maybe a few super stars are told they absolutely should take any TT offer. But if you accept a job in April, you have months ahead of you with potentially better offers. ugh.

Amanda

In my above comment I obviously meant "if you accept a job in November you potentially have months of alternative offers ahead..."

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