Our books






Become a Fan

« Boss moves on the job market? | Main | A reminder, and a "job-market boot camp" »

03/12/2015

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Marcus Arvan

Axel: Great post, and I have an immediate question! :) I have a monograph newly under contract, and I'm wondering what the revision/feedback process on your monograph was like. How many outside readers did you have? Etc.

Axel Gelfert

Thanks, Marcus! For my last book ('A Critical Introduction to Testimony', 2014), published by Bloomsbury a year ago, I received two readers' reports, approximately two and a half months after submitting the manuscript. One was quite short, essentially pointing out only a few minor typos and omissions, the other was more detailed, with substantive (though entirely straightforward) comments/suggestions concerning 5 out of the total of 11 chapters. The publisher also obtained short reviews (endorsements for their website) from two senior colleagues, but these were not the same as the peer reviewers (I assume it's standard practice to keep the two groups separate) -- as I found out when I emailed one of them later on. I'll write a longer post on my experiences with book publishing soon...

Jerry Green

Great idea! Here's a few off the top of my head thoughts of varying importance and interest:

I'd like to see people's thoughts on picking a venue to submit to, especially in specific areas (e.g. Should I submit to general journal X of quality B+, or more obscure area journal Y of quality A-).

I'm also interested in the norms & etiquette of contacting editors. I've heard about people appealing a decision, or leveraging a long paper into two publications, but I have no idea how I would even go about beginning such a discussion without ticking off the editor.

Also, the R&R process, though there's an older Cocoon post on the topic here: http://philosopherscocoon.typepad.com/blog/2013/09/how-to-respond-to-a-revise-resubmit-verdict.html

And there was a post not too long ago about conferences vs. journals. So maybe something about converting a conference paper into a journal article.

And this might be too nuts-and-bolts, but I've always been stumped about citation styles. I usually just use whatever is used by one of the main sources for the present paper, but who knows. I know philosophy as a discipline doesn't use a single style, but is one format more common than others? Should we just not care, given that it'll be addressed in the copy-editing stage anyway?

Axel Gelfert

Thanks, JG, for these questions/suggestions -- I hope to address some of them in future posts; I think the process of turning conference papers into publications is especially significant. In particular, I think it works both ways: thinking of a conference paper as (at least potentially) a publication usually gives it more focus and makes for a better conference presentation! -- Regarding citation styles, I don't think this ever matters at the point of submitting an article -- though, of course, changing the citation style to conform with the journal's stylesheet can create considerable work once the paper has been accepted...

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Open job-market threads